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Persian Blee (with Emacs)

Emacs, Blee (By* Libre Emacs Environment) and Persian Blee

This information applies to Emacs, Blee and Persian Blee as halaal software. Definition of halaal manner-of-existence of software is provided in:

Emacs and usage of Emacs on proprietary platforms (such as Microsoft Windows or Apple) is outside of the scope of this document.

Primary scope of the information is PersoArabic aspects of: Emacs, Gnu/Linux and XeLaTeX.

Contents

1  About Blee and Persian Blee

Blee (the ByStar Libre Emacs Environment) is a layer above Emacs that integrates GNU/Linux capabilities into Emacs, and provides close integration with the ByStar Services. An overview of this User Environment is provided in:

Blee – ByStar Libre Emacs Environment:
A User Environment For The Halaal/Libre ByStar Digital Ecosystem
http://www.persoarabic.org/PLPC/180004

“Persian Blee” refers to usage of Blee with Persian.

2  About Emacs Persian Input Methods

Two built-in Persian input methods are part of the Emacs 24 distribution.

farsi-isiri-9149:

farsi-isiri-9149: A Persian keyboard based on the Islamic Republic of Iran’s ISIRI-9147 specification.
farsi-transliterate-banan:

An intuitive transliteration keyboard for Farsi.

For additional information, please see:

Persian Input Methods
For Emacs And More Broadly Speaking
شیوه‌هایِ درج به فارسی‌
http://www.persoarabic.org/PLPC/120036

3  Persian With Emacs

This information applies to emacs version 24.2.50.1 or higher.

Enabling Persian in Emacs is very simple.

If you already are an emacs user, you can skip over to section 3.3 and continue reading from there.

If you are completely new to emacs, the information below is sufficient to permit you to install emacs, enable Persian and start using emacs as your Persian user environment.

3.1  About Emacs

Emacs is world’s most potent multilingual editor-centered user experience platform. Emacs comes with a rich mail reader, a personal planner, an address book, a calendar, spell checkers for English and Persian, multi-lingual dictionary interfaces and many other tools and packages; all integrated together. Because Emacs supports Persian, all these tools and packages also support Persian.

Some useful links to emacs related resources are included below:

3.2  Obtaining Emacs

Emacs is halaal/libre/free software.

The primary access page for emacs is:

You can obtain the sources for emacs and build it yourself or you can obtain pre-built binaries.

Instructions for obtaining emacs in various forms and for various platforms are also included below.

3.2.1  Obtaining Emacs Sources

When Emacs 24.3 is released You can obtain the source for emacs 24.3 with:

The latest version from the repository trunk can be obtained with:

git clone git://git.savannah.gnu.org/emacs.git

Then you can build emacs from sources by following the instructions.

3.2.2  Binaries For Debian GNU/Linux and Ubuntu

Snapshots of the repository trunk are regularly built for Debian and Ubuntu. You can obtain these from:

Once Emacs 24 is included in distributions of Debian and Ubuntu, all you have to do is:

sudo apt-get install emacs

3.2.3  Binaries For MS Windows

We do not encourage use of any software on the proprietary/haraam Microsoft Windows platform. From the Halaal Software perspective, use of any software under Windows is at best makruh – مکروه . Use GNU/Linux instead.

Snapshots of the repository trunk are regularly built for MS Windows. You can obtain these from:

3.3  Obtaining Persian Blee

Blee (the ByStar Libre Emacs Environment [] is a layer above Emacs that integrates GNU/Linux capabilities into Emacs, and provides close integration with the ByStar Services. The ByStar Federation of Autonomous Libre Services [] is a unified Halaal services model, unifying and making consistent a large number of services that currently exist in functional isolation.

Information about obtaining Blee can be found at: http://www.persoarabic.org/PLPC/180004

3.4  Selecting Persian Language

Using Emacs menus, select:
“Options” - “Multilingual Environment” - “Set Language Environment” - “Persian”.

Or you can select the Persian language with Emacs commands.

The notation “M-:” in the following commands means you press the “Meta” key (often the Esc key) followed by “:”. The “M-:” is then followed by the elisp form. For some commands the “M-:” does not appear; in this case you just need to eval the elisp form.

M-: (set-language-environment "Persian")

To see language environment settings, using Emacs menus, select:
“Options” - “Multilingual Environment” - “Describe Language Environment” - “Persian”.

or invoke the Emacs command:

M-: (describe-language-environment "Persian")

3.5  Selecting Persian Input Methods

Emacs comes with two built-in Persian input methods:

farsi-isiri-9149:
A Persian keyboard based on the Islamic Republic of Iran’s ISIRI-9147 specification. See Section ?? for details.
farsi-transliterate-banan:
An intuitive transliteration keyboard for Farsi. See Section ?? for details.

With Plain Emacs

With the language environment set to “Persian”, using Emacs menus, select:
“Options” - “Multilingual Environment” - “Toggle Input Method”.

Now, your keyboard is configured for Persian as farsi-transliterate-banan.

To activate the ISIRI-9147 keyboard, enter the command:

M-: (set-input-method ’farsi-isiri-9149)

To activate the transliterate keyboard, enter the command:

M-: (set-input-method ’farsi-transliterate-banan)

Alternatively you can select these options from the “Options-Multilingual Environment” menu.

To toggle back to the English keyboard type C-\ (hold down the Ctrl key while typing the character \).

To see a description of either input method, use the commands:

(describe-input-method 'farsi-transliterate-banan) (describe-input-method 'farsi-isiri-9149)

With Persian Blee

Using Persian Blee, just press the F6 key twice. Your input method and language environment (spell checking, dictionaries, etc.) are then all set to Persian.

Press the F6 twice again to toggle back to the English keyboard.

3.6  A Sample Farsi Editing Session

Let’s start from scratch and walk through the steps involved in writing a simple sentence both in Farsi and in English.

  • Install Emacs 24 on your system based on the information in section 3.1.
  • Open a file: (for example “example.fa”)
    Menu:”File” - “Visit New File” - “example.fa”
  • Select Persian Language (section 3.3)
    Menu: “Options” - “Multilingual Environment” - “Describe Language Environment” - “Persian”.
  • Select the farsi-transliterate-banan Persian Input Method (section 3.4)
    Menu: “Options” - “Multilingual Environment” - “Toggle Input Method”
  • Consider that we want to write:
    حالا، با نرم افزار حلال میتوانیم به فارسی سالم و خوش بنویسیم.
  • Note that we are not writing in pinglish. Ignore the vowels and think of the Persian writing above letter-by-letter.
    Now type:
    Hala, ba nrm afzar Hlal mitvanim bh farsi salm v khush bnvisim.
    
  • Toggle back to English C-\ or
    Menu: “Options” - “Multilingual Environment” - “Toggle Input Method”
  • Now enter something in English, for example:
    Now, with Halaal software we can write well in Persian.
    
    Note that the empty line between the Farsi paragraph and the English paragraph properly took care of directionality.
  • We are done, so let’s save the file and close this buffer.
    Menu: “File” - “Save”.
    Menu: “File” - “Close”.

Kool!

With Emacs, you are using world’s most potent multilingual editor-centered user experience platform. And it is Halaal/Libre/Free. And it is Gratis/Free-of-Charge. And it has everything – a Persian spell checker, an email interface, calendar, address book, personal planner, ...

To learn more and explore more, you can try:
Menu: “Help” - “Read the Emacs Manual”.
and
Menu: “Help” - “Tutorial”.

Also, some Persian specific help is included below.



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